‘Brownie’

Rest in Peace Allen Brown ‘Brownie’ (passed away last night – 30/08/21) – owner/driver: Hydrophobia. Known and loved by many, Brownies character was larger than life. He was a Big Man with a Big Spirit and a Big Heart! And with an interesting life well lived, he leaves many stories to tell…. Brownie will be missed by us all, alas, this LEGEND will always live on … (and most especially in the hearts of his Gill-Girl Harem).

– Pictured below: Allen Brown/Hydrophobia doing the kilo run (one boat on it’s own over a measured kilometre) at Lake Eppalock – 76mph (circa 1974).

Sierra

GILFLITE Spitfire – Sierra model – Maintenance and Upgrade

GILFLITE maintenance & upgrade

Here’s some footage to keep your heart beating during lockdown.

*Recently completed GILFLITE maintenance & upgrade (mechanical & hull) to GILFLITE Spitfire- Sierra model.

Includes supply & fit Borgwarner Fwd – Neutral – Reverse gear box, cross over exhaust system, extended exhaust pipes, engine flushing kit, current style Spitfire rear lounge – interior re trim to custom design, acid wash/cut & polish, updated decals & graphics, trailer detail 👍🏼

Photo gallery below with video footage of engine running showing crossover system, flushing kit, gear box.

GILFLITE maintenance & upgrade

E.C. Griffith Cup 2021

GP1 – Driver: Grant Harrison

The Guts & Glory of Boat Racing

 E.C. GRIFFITH CUP – Australian Motorboat Racing
Claimed to be the Worlds most spectacular sport

In my eyes it’s the most thrilling and probably dangerous sport to watch.

You don’t just see and hear it, you feel it! (and it’s magnificent to say the least) – I love this sport. From a spectators perspective, it’s such a fantastic sport to watch; the sights and the sounds reverberate right through into the core of oneself. Drawing one in to feel a part of the entire experience. May I say “it rocks my soul”. Yet my heart is in my throat as I watch from the banks, the bravest of brave men, risk all for a win! I am truly humbled by a hardcore sport! As I admire from the banks of the race circuit, the dedication, commitment and loyalty of the crew, the great teamwork, the family inclusion, and the friendships built on the circuit, along with the lifelong support of the spectators and all those involved as I see familiar faces grown old and sun-kissed bodies enjoying another season with 2nd 3rd and 4th generation in tow.

Born and bred on this foreshore, this sport is in my blood, yet still I enjoy a profound experience – perhaps brought on by the excitement, the thrill and the loudness of those engines …. As we walk along the foreshore and through the crowd, I quietly smile to myself when I notice the wife of an ‘old-timer’ comfortably sitting in her deck chair ‘knitting’ between races. Content and quite at home on the banks of the Yarrawonga foreshore, clearly this ain’t her first rodeo! The air is filled with a par’fume of fuel – beer and BBQ’s. What’s not to love about this place?

From the pits I experience the religion of boat racing;

FAITH

Faith in the Crew

Faith in the Boat Builder

Faith in the Boat Owner

Faith in the Driver

Faith in the Organisers

Faith in the Volunteers

and Faith in the Spectators, those who dream and those who cheer!!

“My Oath’ – ……

POLL POSITION

The next race is scheduled to start and the ENGINES FIRE UP! Watching the drivers idle out from the pits as they head to the start boat to take their qualifying position ….. (I notice a great photo opportunity and snap a pic of one of the drivers sitting in the cockpit of his race boat waiting for his race to be announced – and a thought passes through my mind when a crew member leans in ands says exactly what I was thinking “deep down you’re aware that it could be the last picture taken cause anything could happen out there” ….).

Suddenly the flag drops and it’s game on,! The ROAR is like nothing on earth! The sensational sound goes right through me and the feeling is PURE BLISS! But; we’re all aware that anything could happen during the race. The essence of awareness and focus kick in.

On the other end of these most spectacular races are the crew, the partners and kids on the foreshore and in the pits all having done their part, hoping for a win but to a greater extent they want to ensure the driver returns from the race unharmed and better still with the boat in tact. Of course the win is the ultimate bonus.

Meanwhile the ever watchful eye of the commentators along with their quick witted reporting, know-how and familiarity with boat racing keep the crowd informed in an upbeat style that can only come with experience and an excellent knowledge of the sport. With such experience and enthusiasm they cleverly combine all of whats happening together, and do a remarkable job commentating on the action!

Two days of water sporting exhilaration! A must do for all thrill-seekers and in my eyes a sport that requires more promotion. Get in on the action and mark the dates in your calendar for next year.

Amazon.com: Checkered Flag Racing Vinyl Graphic Car Truck Window Decal  Sticker #1 - Die Cut Vinyl Decal for Windows, Cars, Trucks, Tool Boxes,  laptops, MacBook - virtually Any Hard, Smooth Surface: Arts,

In the Pits with the fast and furious and the unexpected set-backs, as they say “it is what it is” …. the guts and the glory of boat racing at it’s best from the banks of the Yarrawonga foreshore.

Times ‘R’ Tuff

Times ‘R’ Tuff – 1.6 litre hydro – owner: Megan Norrish ‘Boss Lady’ – Driver: Paul Norrish ‘Frog’ – Crew: Jetta (son)

WINNING IS EVERYTHING!

GRIFFITH CUP KIDS

Junior Racing – the young brave hearts remain cool, calm & courageous as they relax in the drivers seat while the parents take care of the line up ….

Start your engines!

AUSSIE CONNECTION

Aussie Connection – originally built in the GILFLITE factory using a new method, the Americans said it couldn’t be done but GILFLITE did it!

A few facts about the lake that provides the circuit for this almighty race ….

Yarrawonga was founded in 1868 and made a shire in 1891. Its name derives perhaps from an Aboriginal term meaning “cormorant’s nesting place” or from a combination of yarra and wonga, meaning “flowing water” and “pigeon,” respectively. (Google Wikki)

Mulwala  is a town in the Federation Council local government area in the Riverina district of New South Wales, Australia. … The town’s name is derived from an aboriginal word for ‘rain’.

Lake Mulwala, a man–made reservoir created through the construction of the Yarrawonga Weir across the Murray River, is located between Bundalong and Yarrawonga in Hume region of Victoria and Mulwala in the Riverina region of New South Wales, in eastern Australia.

Story and Photography by Paula Gill (Gill Girl Art)

Vamoose

GILFLITE Heirloom Boat – the much loved ‘Vamoose’

Now a third generation Javelin, this legend of a boat has many tales to tell including the time it fell off the back of the trailer, the beautiful wedding it hosted and not to mention the time it caught on fire. Vamoose has been a lifelong member of the ‘Cesari family’ and recently came back to GILFITE for some special maintenance and upgrade work to meet the expectations of the grandkids as the family grows enjoying life on the water in their GILFLITE.

It was our privilege to work on this time honoured Javelin Mk I

Here’s a jigsaw album of the Javelin in restoration until we get some on water action shots……

“Shine on you crazy diamond”

Bonnie Doon Bridge

Under the Bonnie Doon Bridge – ‘we bow’ – in our GILFLITE Spitfire

Check out this cool shot! – photo circa early 90’s – Taken on one of our late afternoon / early evening jaunts up to Bonnie Doon for a sneaky after-work ski. During the week (and on a school night:), always confident we’d find glassy water. The boat was hooked up and ready to go! We’d hit the road, ignoring the speed limit, windows down, music loud & wind in our faces. The doon at noon was perfect, we had the whole lake to ourselves. Back in the dayz when not only was there deep water under the prominent Bonnie Doon bridge but we’d almost have to bow our head as we drove the boat across the sacred water and underneath that well engineered bridge. We’d usually arrive back in Melbourne around 10pm ready for bed and work the next day. “Life was great with this Spitfire”

story by: Gill Girl Media ‘6 Sisters’

Esprit by GILFLITE

Swedish Ski Team

When the Swedish Ski Team came out to Australia to train during our summer (their winter), they skied/trained behind the GILFLITE Esprit. The Ski Team loved the performance of the Esprit so much that they bought the boat and took it back to Sweden with them.

Esprit SDV
The GILFLITE Esprit

The highly-animated Gilflite Esprit plays a ‘spiritoso’ out on the water. As its name suggests, this bowrider oozes sprightliness and lively intelligence. Ben Sandman preaches the gospel on a ski-boat that’s full of life Renown for their high-quality finish and luxurious appointments, Gilflite ski-boats have been creating waves within the industry for many years. But perhaps none more so than the flagship Esprit bowrider.

Nothing stops the Jeffery Boys

Courage, quiet determination and a dose of sibling rivalry go a long way in perfecting their sport. These spirited young men know how to have fun out on the water!

A very brief history and a few short stories of our Esprit B/R O/B.


We purchased the boat from the original owners in January 2015, and she is stamped as a 2006 build.

Before the Esprit we used to race keelboats (Holland 25, Young 88, Farr 38) and went ocean racing a bit. And many many years ago as kids, we skied behind Streakers (5.85 cruiser and a 5.02).

Life changes and in the interest of safety around the kids, I decided to go back to skiing as two of our three boys are vision and hearing impaired, and rough weather yachting isn’t hugely safe for challenged kids. They both have a degenerative genetic condition and the obvious signs are hearing and vision impairment. Anyway, for skiing they whip off their hearing aids and glasses, pop them into a Tupperware container and get busy on the back! (not sure what is safer, nonetheless, we never have any shortage of fun). They certainly have no shortage of courage and quiet determination. Its interesting how they use tactile skills a their sense of feel on the water to ski. To watch them concentrating and negotiating the whole experience of being towed is quite humbling. Their ’step’ brother Thomas is new to skiing and isn’t the most confident skier but he is learning rapidly, going really well and the other two boys keep a bit of sibling rivalry going. Thomas loves three up shenanigans.

The boat has been to all the usual spots, from Mildura to Rye to Hazelwood Cooling pond and most spots in between. The usual haunts are at Lake Eildon at Goughs Bay or Jerusalem Creek if day tripping. Christmas is typically at Mansfield and down to Goughs to throw in. As I write this we are in East Gippsland planning a skiing holiday here, looks like a new secret spot…

What we love about our Esprit is the brilliant flexibility it offers. We ski in the Bay as we live over the road from it (and occasionally go up the river with food and drinks) but we mostly ski off the boat all day on the lake with 7 plus onboard.  It handles chop, is amazing to ski behind and the kids love mucking around on their wakeboards in between. Bearing in mind none of us have or will ski at Moomba, the Esprit still provides such great accommodation, performance and most of all, flexibility for our boating with very, very few compromises.

One of our favourite trips was up to Mildura with our Tassie friends Andrew Morse, Claire and their youngest daughter Ellie. (They have a Shortline that gets around at the top of the Derwent, New Norfolk which is another beautiful secret spot)  We chartered a houseboat for 8 days over Easter 2019 during the school holidays. Andrew, Claire and Ellie arrived from Tassie late in the afternoon and they jumped into Ange’s (my partner) car and we towed the green machine to Bendigo to break the trip-and it is a fair trip….When we got to Mildura the following day, it was pretty quiet and we just could believe how brilliant the conditions were. As we all know, when someone says how good somewhere is you think, yeah, I’m sure it is, and it’s probably embellished. Well it is actually every bit as good as people say!


Every morning the boys were up for dawn patrol before we finished and they jumped into the spa before breakfast. Isn’t that the best way to enjoy family holidays! The boys progressed their skiing so much in such a short time and best of all, to watch and see their sense of achievement and progressing their goals is fantastic. As always the boat performed flawlessly and we ran up a stack of hours-Andrew and I both had sore arms, backs, hamstrings by the end of the trip which is nice to say when you go for a family trip.

One of our funniest trips was a day trip to Jerusalem Creek once in mid November, just the kids and I. Andrew (son#2,) is as deaf as a post without his cochlear on or hearing aid in (and pretty blind too) and he fell off doing his own version of a world record attempt at 100 or so kneeboard 360’s (its his special thing). Well he fell off about 100 metres from the bank and floating in the water near him looked like a reed from off the bank or the shallows.  It became pretty clear pretty quickly it wasn’t a reed but a snake. So Wes, who’s also vision and hearing impaired, yelled out to Andrew and I suggested that might be fruitless, to which we both giggled (as mentioned, Wes is also hearing and vision impaired). Anyway we grabbed him, scooped him up and he was emphatically reminding us  ‘I haven’t finished yet Dad’ in a somewhat emotional state of confusion as to why his ‘world record’ attempt had been shortened so suddenly. We plugged his ears back in and told him why he had to stop for a bit before went to get his board and headed off elsewhere. That spot is now named ‘snakies’ and the boys laugh like mad whenever it comes up. The interesting thing was the day hadn’t heated up (10am) and the water wasn’t ‘summer’ warm yet, but the snake was still swimming…

No one has more fun than us!

Kind regards
Daniel Jeffery

The Jeffery Boys

The inside on GILFLITE

From the perspective of a customer

Story by David Bennett – long time friend and business associate

The Inside on Gilflite

As an enthusiastic skier, 40 years ago I researched water ski boats extensively and decided to purchase my first new boat:  “The Boat of the Year” – A Gilflite Spitfire.

This began a long association with David Gill and Gilflite Boats.

I know a little about water skiing, having skied for 50 years, performed in over 50 ski shows, taught blind and wheelchair bound individuals to ski (here and in the USA) and taught over 1000 people on doubles – ranging in age from 18 months to 75 years. (The 5 state barefoot titles that have been won along the way are no real claim to fame in Tasmania where competitive bare-footing is very small.)

However, having owned 4 new Gilflite boats (and put an average of 1000 hours on each one) and after spending days in the Gilflite factory,  I can tell you what they are like to own, a bit about how they are built, and I can give you some insight into the workings of the mind of David Gill.

When it comes to designing and manufacturing ski boats: The man has experience.

He initially designed and built race boats, and then raised 6 girls around the family sport of water skiing. He knows what’s needed in a high performance craft which can also function as a family ski boat.

Every Gilflite boat has been designed to satisfy the skier who wants to push the envelope. David’s experience with hulls enables him to fine tune hulls and adjust the moulds to provide the required handling and wash for the end user. I recall him showing me a new asymmetric hull where the port strake was 15 mm shorter than the starboard strake “because we found the engine dropped 100 revs on left hand turns compared to right hand turns because of the direction of the prop rotation and I wanted to correct that”.

The man is fussy.

Providing room and comfort for every member of the family is important.

I remember David moving grab rails lower on the transom after he actually put his wife in the water to measure how high up she could reach when climbing in. “Kids and small women can’t reach a grab rail if it’s too high”

He also designed a driver’s seat which adjusts to raise up as well as come forward. Unless you have a super clean screen and there’s never any glare, looking over the screen is much safer. “Wives and girlfriends often need this height adjustment to safely see over the windscreen”

Speaking of windscreen ….it’s supposed to screen the wind!

Have a drive in many boats and you feel like you have your head out the window of your car. Even on boats with big screens, your vision is often compromised by windscreen joints and mirrors which can deflect wind onto the observer.

The wind in your face might be fine on a super hot day but even then, it starts to get tiring after a time.

Whilst every boat will take a wave over the nose under extreme circumstances, Gilflite boats handle oncoming boat wash exceptionally well. Drivers and passengers do not need to be continually stressed about taking a wave over the front.

Gilflite boats have never been the cheapest.

David Gill has always been committed to producing a quality product. I have personally seen him instruct his factory workers to put in extra fibreglass here, or a strengthener there, to ensure the hulls retain their quality look and appearance , long after the purchase price has been forgotten.

These extras don’t show up on the show room floor but, like selecting better quality seat material and carpet, they ensure the boat doesn’t develop cracks or premature worn patches and retains that show room look for years.

The trend towards synthetic bearers has been resisted at Gilflite. Treated timber remains the material of choice after actual on-water testing showed timber bearers act as sound deadeners resulting in a more pleasant ride for all concerned.

David draws on the skill of a graphic artist to ensure the colours and graphics compliment the lines of the boat, ensuring the boats don’t date and still “look good” for years.

I have seen David design new boats and he never does what’s easy. There is never a flat surface on a Gilflite; instead, every surface is shaped to match the overall lines of the boat. Watching David design and then construct a custom made engine cover recently was amazing as he continually refined the mould to ensure it not only looked good but it retained as much interior room in the boat as possible. I remember years ago how, with clever design, he produced a new 19 foot boat which actually had as much interior space as the average 21ft craft.

Designing is a strength of David Gill.

The Gilflite history web pages list many of his innovations, but near the top of this list might be the ski training boom.

I have watched many boat owners (including several owners of exceptionally expensive craft in the USA) struggle with ski booms which are heavy, awkward and often require two people to install.

When a boom is needed in a Gilflite it can be retrieved in seconds from under the nose, installed by one person whilst on the water and with one click, can be temporarily folded to allow for docking on a pontoon or pier.

 Out on the water, using the Gilflite boom, a 10 year old can achieve in seconds what it takes two men 5 minutes to do on the land with some booms.

This attention to detail and ease of use means few ski boats actually work better or hold their value longer than a Gilflite. This might explain why so many owners are reluctant to part with them.

Having skied with a wide variety of ski boats, both in Australia and in the USA, when all factors are considered, I would not swap my Gilflite Shortline for any boat I have seen anywhere.

David Bennett

Gallery: Ski Antics

BELOW: New Engine Cover by GILFLITE to suit latest model 6.2 litre Mercruiser – up to 350 HP (designed and handcrafted by David Gill for my Shortline during our recent engine upgrade)

BELOW: New Shortline Build

5 GILFLITES – 5 SKIERS

Story by David Bennett

Horsehead Water Ski Club, Devonport Tasmania.

The 5 skiers are about to do a dock start on discs (round flat boards that some people call saucers). 

It’s a favourite pastime for us.

Our club would own 30 of them.

Cheap as chips to make …. 3ft circle of the cheapest ply you can find…a nail and a piece of string to mark out the circle and cut it out with a jigsaw. Word of advice … don’t paint the darn thing or you spend the rest of your life trying to stop them being slippery, cause they have no bindings. (Well, maybe paint the edges just so you can see them in the water, but leave the rest as bare timber which gives just the right amount of grip)

We would often tow 5 or 6 and have a “war” on the water to see who can knock the others off most often. 

A “kamikaze” where both of you go down (usually created by someone throwing a rugby-type tackle onto someone else is considered unworthy of any credit because it’s too easy and requires no skill!)

Our record number of discs behind the Shortline is 17.

I notice this photo (taken the year you first started building Integras ) involves 2 people wearing dry suits, so it must have been early in the season when the water is still really cold ( having started as melted snow 20 km upstream).

Here are are a couple of photos I found which you might find interesting.

One shows 5  Gilflites (the blue spitfire was originally ours and the Integra was our brand new boat at the time ) one of the first you guys (GILFLITE) made. 

The flying dock start is me at a ski show in Hobart.

Skiing is for EVERYONE!

Here’s another ski story from David Bennett (the world record guy – and not to mention a whole lot of other cool stuff that we hope to uncover).

‘The little girl skiing in this photo (above) is blind. The lady on ski’s towed by the boom is wheelchair bound’ – David taught them both how to ski.

In the words of David;

“For several years our ski club hosted days of water skiing for Camp Quality (kids with Cancer). The little blind girl (Emma) was a participant. She was about 10 at the time.
(She would be about 16 now.)
Later I was looking around on the internet to see if anyone else teaches blind people and found LOF Adaptive Skiers (lofadaptiveskiers.org) in the USA. They teach blind people and all sorts of people in wheelchairs (stroke victims, people with missing limbs etc) and I have visited the USA to volunteer on several occasions and on one trip I met Jamie Petrone (who is confined to a wheelchair because of her feet). They were setting her up for a Ski Biscuit and I suggested that the heavy bindings on jump skis should hold her feet sufficiently well to allow her to stand and actually ski.
We taught her to ski standing upright using a training boom and eventually she graduated to a long rope. Last time I was in the States she was crossing wakes and I taught her to dock start.
Jamie is an absolute star and teaches wheelchair dancing and runs an organisation which promotes “Inclusion” in artistic endeavours”. (http://www.thisabilityarts.org/index.php/jamie-petrone)